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I am determined to prove a villain

"And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover
To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determinèd to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days." (, I, i)

(Please use simple language) Here is a passage from Richard III, ACT I, Scene I


Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York:

?
He capers nimbly in a lady?s chamber
To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks
Nor made to court an amoroud looking glass;

?
Why I, in this week piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time,

?
And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover

?
I am determined to prove a villain.


a) Explain the pun in the first two lines.
b) Who is the ?He?

Soliloquy:

I am determined to prove a villain ..

I am determined to prove a villain And hate the idle pleasures of these days

In Richard’s opening soliloquy, he characterizes himself as "rudely stamped . . . Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, / Deformed, unfinished, sent before my time / Into this breathing world scarce half made up" (I.19-21). "[S]ince I cannot prove a lover," he asserts, "I am determined to prove a villain" (I.28,30). From the very first act, then, Shakespeare establishes Richard’s villainy as inextricably bound to his embodiment.

The wit and irony of Richard’s words are apparent in the next act, in which he proves himself a capable lover, at least in language, by successfully wooing Anne Neville as she walks in mourning behind her father-in-law’s casket. The play is thus engaged not only with the body and "deformity," but also with deformity’s social and rhetorical aspects. Richard knows, uses, and even performs the cultural meanings of his body, as emphasized by his dramatic display of his arm in Act III.4 as evidence that his brother’s widow has used witchcraft against him, making political use of what Erving Goffman would call his "spoiled identity."

"I am determined to prove a villain ..

And therefore
since I cannot prove a lover to entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determined to prove a villain and hate the idle pleasures of
these days.” He says that since he was not made to be a lover, he has
no use for peace, and will willingly destroy peace with his crimes.

soliloquy: “I am determined to prove a villain ..

But when rookie officer Judy Hopps arrives, she discovers that being the first bunny on a police force of big, tough animals isn’t so easy. Determined to prove herself, she jumps at the opportunity to crack a case, even if it means partnering with Nick Wilde—a fast-talking, scam-artist fox—to solve a mystery.

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I am determinèd to prove a villain


I am determined to prove a villain and ..

And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover
To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determinèd to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous,
By drunk prophecies, libels, and dreams,
To set my brother Clarence and the king
In deadly hate the one against the other;
And if King Edward be as true and just
As I am subtle, false, and treacherous,
This day should Clarence closely be mewed up
About a prophecy which says that “G”
Of Edward’s heirs the murderer shall be.
Dive, thoughts, down to my soul — here Clarence comes!

‘I Am Determined to Prove a Villain” Despite His Wickedness, ..

Richard is a villain and he outright tells us in his opening soliloquy, “I am determined to prove a villain” (I.i.30), but he is a very charismatic and fascinating figure and for much of the play we sympathize or are impressed with him.

I am determinèd to prove a villain.

Similar, though less extreme, events have occurred throughout the vast majority of the third world. Cambodia was merely the most monstrous of these of these events, but there have been many others, smaller in scale but equal in horror and depravity. In countries where people live close to hunger, most of the third world, state intervention to improve people lives has invariably resulted in mass starvation, these catastrophes being most photogenic in Africa. This mass starvation has often resulted in resistance the these benefits and improvements, which has resulted in extraordinarily brutal terror and torture, to extort continued submission to government aid. Especially entertaining is the suffering of the unfortunate recipients of government to government aid. One notable example is the World Bank resettlement program in Ethiopia, where hundreds of thousands of people who failed to appreciate the generous aid their Marxist government provided them were resettled in extermination camps built by the World Bank, and shipped to those camps in cattle trucks supplied by the World Bank (Bandow, Bovard, Keyes). Another amusing example of your taxes at work providing the greatest good for the greatest number was the World Bank's Akosombo dam project (Bovard, Lappe 35 37). Most attempts to determine the greatest good for the greatest number have had similar outcomes, it is just that in affluent societies the consequences are less flagrant, less brutally obvious. In a poor society an attempt to provide the greatest good for the greatest number usually results in starvation, death, torture, and maiming. In an affluent society it merely produces poverty, fatherless children, homelessness, street crime, and discreet police violence.

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