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Several themes are presented in the novel to kill a mocking bird.

In To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee argues that negative repercussions will arise when one attempts to step out of their preordained place in a small judgmental society.

Finch’s moral test comes at the end of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Bob Ewell has been humiliated by the Robinson trial. In revenge, he attacks Scout and her brother on Halloween night. Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor of the Finches, comes to the children’s defense, and in the scuffle Radley kills Ewell. Sheriff Tate brings the news to Finch, and persuades him to lie about what actually happened; the story will be that Ewell inadvertently stabbed himself in the scuffle. As the Sheriff explains:

The characters of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird are all different in their own ways.

One of the reoccurring themes in to kill a mockingbird is courage.

This is evident numerous times throughout Harper Lee’s fictional novel To Kill a Mockingbird.

By contrast, Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird, published in 1960, written almost a century after Whitman’s poem, portrays the mockingbird as innocent but as a fragile creature with horrific memories – memories of discrimination, isolation, and violence.

Maudie, one of the main protagonists in To Kill a Mockingbird, warns the young girl Scout that mockingbirds should not to be killed or hunted down because they represent those who are kind and innocent.

To kill a mockingbird is to destroy that innocence.

In “To Kill a Mockingbird” Harper Lee illustrates a variety of different kinds of courage through many of her characters, using pride, morality, impulsiveness, and anger as the main reasons of its execution.

Throughout To Kill A Mockingbird, one will observe that nearly every character is a mockingbird.

Big Jim Folsom left office in 1959. The next year, a young Southern woman published a novel set in mid-century Alabama about one man’s proud and lonely stand for racial justice. The woman was Harper Lee and the novel was “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and one way to make sense of Lee’s classic—and of a controversy that is swirling around the book on the eve of its fiftieth anniversary—is to start with Big Jim Folsom.

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That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (p.90) Miss.


She tries to tell Jem about why mockingbirds should not be killed.

Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird", however, is unique among all these poignant pieces of literature in that the novel solely develops Lee's idea, brought out by Atticus in the novel, to "...shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird" (90).

Symbolism is indeed used extensively in the novel To Kill a .

Shoot all the bluejays you want , if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." This is what Atticus Finch tells his children after they are given air-rifles for Christmas.

This symbol of mockingbird appears in the story many times.

In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Tom Robinson, a black man in a mostly white community, faces accusations and a subsequent trial for the rape of Mayella Ewell, a white girl of the town....

Tom Robinson is another example of a mockingbird.

Atticus is telling Scout and Jem how top use their shotguns for the first time, he says, 'Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit'em but remember it's a sign to kill a Mockingbird.' Harper Lee uses symbolism implicitly to liken mocking birds to certain characters and explicit references to describe the atmosphere cr...

That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.

The story ends with the reading of a book by Atticus, The Grey Ghost, another symbol perhaps for Boo Radley whose "face was as white as his hands and his grey eyes were so colourless" (276), a description fitting to one of a ghost.

To Kill a Mockingbird took place is a town called Maycomb.

Before she falls asleep Scout describes the story which happens to be about someone falsely accused of doing something he never did, exactly like Tom Robinson and Boo Radley, the two mockingbirds of the story so wrongly treated by others.

- Scout serves a central role in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch is portrayed as an extraordinary character who teaches valuable life lessons about morals, courage, and sacrifice....

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Use of Symbols and Symbolism

These blameless individuals were referred to mockingbirds, since it was a sin to kill one as said by Atticus, “Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” So, therefore mockingbirds are a rep...

Free Essays on Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird

It is useful, once again, to consider Finch’s conduct in the light of the historical South of his time. The scholar Lisa Lindquist Dorr has examined two hundred and eighty-eight cases of black-on-white rape that occurred in Virginia between 1900 and 1960. Seventeen of the accused were killed through “extra legal violence”—that is to say, lynched. Fifty were executed. Forty-eight were given the maximum sentence. Fifty-two were sentenced to prison terms of five years or less, on charges ranging from rape and murder to robbery, assault and battery, or “annoying a white woman.” Thirty-five either were acquitted or had their charges dismissed. A not inconsiderable number had their sentences commuted by the governor.

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