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Environmental Ethics Essay example - 2762 Words | …

In the field of sustainable development, there are many major challenges to be addressed. They require us to re-think our economy and our growth in favour of a society that is more economical in its use of raw materials and energy. Some of these challenges include: climate change, energy consumption, waste production, threats to public health, poverty, social exclusion, management of natural resources, loss of biodiversity, and land use. In this context, sustainable development approaches are now essential obligations.

Sustainable development must mainly be able to respond to the various problems raised by demographic growth, the planet’s limited capacity, and social inequality. In 2100, the world’s population will be close to 10 billion, but the Earth does not have unlimited resources, especially since individual consumption has been increasing considerably because the less developed countries wish to catch up with the others. Greenhouse gas emissions are one of the main consequences of human activity that accelerate global warming. This warming carries risks of shortages and the disruption of certain natural cycles such as fresh water, impoverishment of agricultural soil, deforestation, and reduced biodiversity. This means that the future development of all species living on earth, ultimately including human beings, is under threat.

In order to be sustainable, development must also be harmonious. At least a certain amount of social cohesion must exist on a planetary scale in order to create the conditions for the peace we need. Major differences between the situations of economic players are sources of tension and conflict. The North/South economic divide and the unequal distribution of the consumption of the planet’s natural resources between the world’s populations are notable potential causes of tension. Will the 10 billion men and women inhabiting our planet in 2100 be able to live as well as the 750 million people in industrialized nations do today?

Sustainable development is based on the institution of standards. The new European REACH regulations came into force on 1st June 2007. REACH stands for ‘Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals’. The main objectives of REACH are: better protection of human health and the environment against the risks that can be caused by chemicals. It also promotes better knowledge of the chemical substances used in industry. The aim of this standard is not to use toxic products for the sake of health and the environment, and to replace them with inoffensive products.


REACH regulations concern all industries and all materials that exist on the European market, whether produced in the European Union or imported, from one tonne per year. It obliges companies to register their substances with the European Chemicals Agency; otherwise, they will not be authorised for placement on the European market. Nevertheless, this registration is not applicable to substances already covered by other regulations (radioactive substances, medication, phytopharmaceutical products, biocidal products, food additives, etc.). Other categories, such as polymers, are subject to special handling.

Sandler, Ronald.
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Ethical Decision Making Essay Examples

Ethics Essays: Examples, Topics, Titles, & Outlines
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Forman, Richard T. T., Daniel Sperling, John A. Bissonette, Anthony P. Clevenger, Carol D. Cusall, Virginia H. Dale, Lenore Fahrig, Robert France,Charles R. Goldman, Kevin Heanue, Julia A. Jones, Frederick J. Swanson, Thomas Turrentine, and Thomas C. Winter. Road Ecology: Science and Solutions. 109-12.Foster, John Bellamy. Marx's Ecology: Materialism and Nature. 313-15.Fox, Michael W. Returning to Eden: Animal Rights and HumanResponsibility. 83-89.Fox, Stephen. John Muir and His Legacy: The American ConservationMovement. 277-81.Fox, Warwick, ed. Ethics and the Built Environment. 217-20.---. A Theory of General Ethics: Human Relationships, Nature, and the Built Environment. 215-16. ---. Toward a Transpersonal Ecology: Developing NewFoundations for Environmentalism. 181-83.Framarin, Christopher G. Hinduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy. 369-72France, Robert L., ed. Healing Natures, Repairing Relationships: New Perspectives on Restoring Ecological Spaces and Consciousness. 321-22. Francione, Gary L. Animals, Property, and the Law. 319-22.Frieden, Bernard J. The Environmental Hustle. 85-94.Fritsch, Al and Paul Gallimore. Healing Appalachia: Sustainable Living through Appropriate Technologies. 219-20.Frodeman, Robert, ed. Earth Matters: The Earth Sciences, Philosophy,and the Claims of Community. 215-18.---. Geo-Logic: Breaking Ground between Philosophy and the Earth Sciences. 97-100.Gaard, Greta, ed. Ecofeminism: Women, Animals, Nature. 315-19.Gadon, Elinor W. The Once and Future Goddess: A Symbol of OurTime. 275-80.Garcia-Johnson, Ronie. Exporting Environmentalism: U.S. MultinationalChemical Corporations in Brazil and Mexico. 317-20.Gardiner, Stephen M. A Perfect Moral Storm: The Ethical Tragedy of Climate Change. 331-32.Garner, Robert. Animal Ethics. 219-22.Gerstenfeld, Manfred. Judaism, Environmentalism and the Environment:Mapping and Analysis. 223-24.Girardot, N. J., James Miller, and Liu Xiaogan, eds. Daoism and Ecology: Ways within a Cosmic Landscape. 105-06.Glave, Dianne D., and Mark Stoll, eds. To Love the Wind and the Rain: African Americans and Environmental History. 317-18.Goldfarb, Theodore, ed. Taking Sides: Clashing Views on EnvironmentalIssues. 89-90.Goodpaster, K. E., and K. M. Sayre, eds. Ethics and Problemsof the 21st Century. 373-78.Gore, Al. Earth in the Balance. 363-69.Gorke, Martin. The Death of Our Planet's Species: A Challenge to Ecology and Ethics. 433-36.Gorz, Andre. Ecology as Politics. 189-90.Gottlieb, Robert, and Anupama Joshi. Food Justice. : 127-28.Gottlieb, Roger S. A Greener Faith: Religious Environmentalism and Our Planet's Future. 441-42.---. The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Ecology. 439-42.---. A Spirituality of Resistance: Finding a Peaceful Heart and Protecting the Earth. 213-16.Graber, Linda H. Wilderness as Sacred Space. 186-88.Gray, Elizabeth Dodson. Why the Green Nigger? 187-91.Griffin, Donald R. Animal Thinking. 179-82.Gross, Matthias. Inventing Nature: Ecological Restoration by Public Experiments. 333-34.Guha, Ramachandra. How Much Should a Person Consume? Environmentalism in India and the United States. 97-100.Gunn, Alastair S. and P. Aarne Vesilind. Environmental Ethicsfor Engineers. 177-79.Halper, John., ed. Gary Snyder: Dimensions of a Life. 185-90.Hampton, Fen Osler, and Judith Reppy, eds. Earthly Goods, EnvironmentalChange, and Social Justice. 335-36.Hanson, Philip P., ed. Environmental Ethics: Philosophy andPolicy Perspectives. 357-62.Hardin, Garrett. The Limits of Altruism. 83-88.---. Living within Limits: Ecology, Economics, and PopulationTaboos. 331-36.---. Naked Emperors. 75-79.---. The Ostrich Factor: Our Population Myopia. 327-28.---. Promethean Ethics: Living With Death, Competition, andTriage. 283-87.Hargrove, Eugene C., ed. The Animal Rights/Environmental EthicsDebate: The Environmental Perspective. 279-82.---, ed. Beyond Spaceship Earth. 187-89.---. Foundations of Environmental Ethics. 169-77.---, ed. Religion and Environmental Crisis. 181-83.Harré, Rom, Jens Brockmeier, and Peter Mülhäusle. Greenspeak: A Study of Environmental Discourse. 207-10.Hart, John. Sacramental Commons: Christian Ecological Ethics. 217-20.---. The Spirit of the Earth. 283-85.

---. Reinhabitating Reality: Towards a Recovery of Culture. By Freya Mathews. 99-102.Attfield, Robin. Environmental Ethics. By Holmes Rolston, III. 363-68.---. Progress and Privilege. By William Tucker. 181-83.Austin, Richard Cartwright. Earth, Sky, Gods Mortals: Developingan Ecological Spirituality. By Jay B. McDaniel. 361-65.---. Of Gods and Pelicans: A Theology of Reverence for Life. By Jay McDaniel. 361-65.---. Saving Creation: Nature and Faith in the Life of Holmes Rolston, III. By Christopher J. Preston. : 417-20.Auxier, Randall E. Ecological Resistance Movements: The GlobalEmergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism. Edited by RaymondTaylor Bron. 97-100.Backhaus, Gary. Safeguarding Our Common Future: RethinkingSustainable Development. By Ingrid Leman Stefanovic. 437-40.Bahm, Archie J. Marx and Engels on Ecology. By Howard Parsons. 283-85.Baird, Davis. Technology and the Good Life? Edited by EricHiggs, Andrew Light, and David Strong. 325-28.Baker, Jennifer. The Environmental Crisis: Understanding theValue of Nature. By Mark Rowlands. 321-24.Bannon, Bryan. Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Nature. By Ted Toadvine. : 433-36.Banta, Erik Haugland. Ecophilosophy: A Field Guide to the Literature. By Donald Edward Davis. 369-70.Barry, Joyce M. Nature's Altars: Mountains, Gender, and American Environmentalism. By Susan Schrepfer. 443-44.Bauman, Whitney A. Theological Foundations for Environmental Ethics: Reconstructing Patristic and Medieval Concepts. By James Schaefer. : 331-33.Bell, Derek. Noxious New York: The Racial Politics of Urban Health and Environmental Justice. By Julie Sze. 221-22.Bendik-Keymer, Jeremy. Thinking like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy after the End of Nature. By Steven Vogel. 507-08Bernstein, Mark. Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Edited by Erin McKennna and Andrew Light. 107-10.Best. Steve. The New Earth Reader: The Best of Terra Nova. Edited by David Rothenberg and Marta Ulvacus. 105-08.Birch, Thomas H. The Natural Alien. By Neil Evernden. 283-87.Biro, Andrew. Ecology and Historical Materialism. By JonathanHughes. 109-110.---. The Land That Could Be: Environmentalism and Democracyin the Twenty-first Century. By William A. Shutkin. 93-96.Bissell, Steven J. Bloodties: Nature, Culture, and the Hunt. By Ted Kerasote. 441-44.---. Kinship to Mastery: Biophilia in Human Evolution and Development. By Stephen R. Kellert. 213-16.---. The Value of Life: Biological Diversity and Human Society. By Stephen R. Kellert. 213-16.---. A View to Death in the Morning: Hunting and Nature throughHistory. By Matt Cartmill. 441-44.Black, Michael. Fishy Business: Salmon, Biology, and the SocialConstruction of Nature. By Rik Scarce. 431-32.Blondeau, Robert. Reinventing Nature? Responses to PostmodernDeconstructionism. Edited by Michael E. Soulé and GaryLease. 105-08.Bonifazi, Conrad. Technology-Humanism or Nihilism. By GregoryH. Davis. 87-89.Boonin, David. Animal, Vegetable, or Woman? A Feminist Critiqueof Ethical Vegetarianism. By Kathryn Paxton George. 429-32.Booth, Annie L. Earthly Goods, Environmental Change, and SocialJustice. Edited by Fen Osler Hampson and Judith Reppy. 335-315.---. Ecofeminism and Globalization. Edited by Heather Eaton and Lois Lorentzen. 317-18.

3 Approaches to Ethics: Principles, Outcomes and Integrity

James Yeates. "Whale Killers and Whale Rights: The Future of the International Regulation of Whaling." 489-99Young, R. V., Jr. "A Conservative View of EnvironmentalAffairs." 241-54.___, and Laurel Waterman. "Sustainability Impeded: Ultra Vires Environmental Issues." 159-74.Zaidi, Iqtidar H. "On the Ethics of Man's Interactionwith the Environment: An Islamic Approach." 35-47.Zimmerman, Michael E. "Feminism, Deep Ecology, and EnvironmentalEthics." 21-44.---. "Quantum Theory, Intrinsic Value, and Panentheism." 3-30.---. "Rethinking the Heidegger-Deep Ecology Relationship." 195-224.---. "Toward a Heideggerean Ethos for Radical Environmentalism." 99-31.Book ReviewersAcampora, Ralph R. Electric Animal: Toward a Rhetoric of Wildlife. By Akira Mizuta Lippit. 219-20.Aiken, William. Food First: Beyond the Myth of Scarcity. ByFrances Moore Lappé and Joseph Collins. 279-82.---. Naked Emperors. By Garrett Hardin. 75-79.Anderson, Dana. Going Away to Think: Engagement, Retreat, and Ecocritical Responsibility. By Scott Slovic. 443-44.Armstrong, Susan J. Being and Value: Toward a ConstructivePostmodern Metaphysics. By Frederick Ferre. 425-28.---. Ecological Ethics and the Human Soul: Aquinas, Whitehead, and the Metaphyscis of Value. By Francisco J. Benzoni. : 99-102.---. The Ethics of Creativity: Beauty, Morality and Nature in a Processive Cosmos. By Brian G. Henning. 209-12.---. For Love of Matter: A Contemporary Panpsychism. By Freya Mathews. 99-102.---. Moral Habitat: Ethos and Agency for the Sake of Earth. By Nancie Erhard. 109-10.---. Reinhabitating Reality: Towards a Recovery of Culture. By Freya Mathews. 99-102.Attfield, Robin. Environmental Ethics. By Holmes Rolston, III. 363-68.---. Progress and Privilege. By William Tucker. 181-83.Austin, Richard Cartwright. Earth, Sky, Gods Mortals: Developingan Ecological Spirituality. By Jay B. McDaniel. 361-65.---. Of Gods and Pelicans: A Theology of Reverence for Life. By Jay McDaniel. 361-65.---. Saving Creation: Nature and Faith in the Life of Holmes Rolston, III. By Christopher J. Preston. : 417-20.Auxier, Randall E. Ecological Resistance Movements: The GlobalEmergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism. Edited by RaymondTaylor Bron. 97-100.Backhaus, Gary. Safeguarding Our Common Future: RethinkingSustainable Development. By Ingrid Leman Stefanovic. 437-40.Bahm, Archie J. Marx and Engels on Ecology. By Howard Parsons. 283-85.Baird, Davis. Technology and the Good Life? Edited by EricHiggs, Andrew Light, and David Strong. 325-28.Baker, Jennifer. The Environmental Crisis: Understanding theValue of Nature. By Mark Rowlands. 321-24.Bannon, Bryan. Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Nature. By Ted Toadvine. : 433-36.Banta, Erik Haugland. Ecophilosophy: A Field Guide to the Literature. By Donald Edward Davis. 369-70.Barry, Joyce M. Nature's Altars: Mountains, Gender, and American Environmentalism. By Susan Schrepfer. 443-44.Bauman, Whitney A. Theological Foundations for Environmental Ethics: Reconstructing Patristic and Medieval Concepts. By James Schaefer. : 331-33.Bell, Derek. Noxious New York: The Racial Politics of Urban Health and Environmental Justice. By Julie Sze. 221-22.Bendik-Keymer, Jeremy. Thinking like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy after the End of Nature. By Steven Vogel. 507-08Bernstein, Mark. Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Edited by Erin McKennna and Andrew Light. 107-10.Best. Steve. The New Earth Reader: The Best of Terra Nova. Edited by David Rothenberg and Marta Ulvacus. 105-08.Birch, Thomas H. The Natural Alien. By Neil Evernden. 283-87.Biro, Andrew. Ecology and Historical Materialism. By JonathanHughes. 109-110.---. The Land That Could Be: Environmentalism and Democracyin the Twenty-first Century. By William A. Shutkin. 93-96.Bissell, Steven J. Bloodties: Nature, Culture, and the Hunt. By Ted Kerasote. 441-44.---. Kinship to Mastery: Biophilia in Human Evolution and Development. By Stephen R. Kellert. 213-16.---. The Value of Life: Biological Diversity and Human Society. By Stephen R. Kellert. 213-16.---. A View to Death in the Morning: Hunting and Nature throughHistory. By Matt Cartmill. 441-44.Black, Michael. Fishy Business: Salmon, Biology, and the SocialConstruction of Nature. By Rik Scarce. 431-32.Blondeau, Robert. Reinventing Nature? Responses to PostmodernDeconstructionism. Edited by Michael E. Soulé and GaryLease. 105-08.Bonifazi, Conrad. Technology-Humanism or Nihilism. By GregoryH. Davis. 87-89.Boonin, David. Animal, Vegetable, or Woman? A Feminist Critiqueof Ethical Vegetarianism. By Kathryn Paxton George. 429-32.Booth, Annie L. Earthly Goods, Environmental Change, and SocialJustice. Edited by Fen Osler Hampson and Judith Reppy. 335-315.---. Ecofeminism and Globalization. Edited by Heather Eaton and Lois Lorentzen. 317-18.---. Beyond Mothering Earth: Ecological Citizenship and the Politics of Care. By Sherilyn MacGregor. 109-10.---. The New Biology: Discovering the Wisdom in Nature. ByRobert Augros and George Stanciu. 93-94.---. Speaking for Ourselves: Environmental Justice in Canada. Edited by Julian Agyeman et al. 97-98.---. Women, the Environment and Sustainable Development: Towardsa Theoretical Synthesis. By Rosi Braidotti, Ewa Charkiewicz, SabineHausler, and Saskia Wieringa. 441.Boston, Tim. Ecopyschology: Restoring the Earth, Healing theMind. Edited by Theodore Roszak, Mary E. Gomes, and Allen D. Kanner. 101-03.Bratton, Susan Power. Beauty of the Lord. By Richard CartwrightAustin. 277-85.---. The Dream of the Earth. By Thomas Berry. 87-89.---. Loving Nature: Ecological Integrity and Christian Responsibility. By James A. Nash. 93-96.---. The Spirit of the Earth. By John Hart . 283-85.Brennan, Andrew. Against Nature: The Concept of Nature in CriticalTheory. By Steven Vogel. 207-10.---. Politics of Nature: How to Bring the Sciences into Democracy. By Bruno Latour. 221-24.Briggle, Adam. Inventing Nature: Ecological Restoration by Public Experiments. By Matthias Gross. 333-34.Brown, Donald A. Privileged Goods: Commoditization and ItsImpact on Environment and Society. By Jack Manno. 313-16.---. Unearthed: The Economic Roots of Our Environmental Crisis. By Kenneth Sayre. : 115-18.---. Nature's Trust: An Environmental Law for A New Ecological Age. By Mary Christina Wood. 245-48Burgess, Andrew J. Energy Ethics: A Christian Response. Editedby Dieter T. Hessel. 189-91.Burnett, H. Sterling. Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, andthe Contested Meaning of Nature. By Jan E. Dizard. 105-09.---. The Idea of Biodiversity: Philosophies of Paradise. ByDavid Takacs. 203-06.Caicco, Gregory. Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology. By David Abram. 333-34.Cafaro, Philip. Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict between Global Conservation and Native Peoples. By Mark Dowie. : 335-36.---. The Moon in the Nautilus Shell:Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered. By Daniel Botkin. 239-40---. Dirty Virtues: The Emergence of Ecological Virtue Ethics. By Louke van Wensveen 211-14.---. Material Faith: Henry David Thoreau on Science. Edited by LauraDassow Walls. 97-98.---. The Pine Island Paradox. By Kathleen Dean Moore. 435-38.---. Skeptical Environmentalism: The Limits of Philosophy and Sciences. By Robert Kirkman. 101-04.---. Wild Fruits: Thoreaus Rediscovered Last Manuscript. Editedby Bradley P. Dean. 97-98.Calarco, Matthew. Animal Oppression and Human Violence: Domesecration, Capitalism, and Global Conflict. By David Nibert. 377-78Callicott, J. Baird. The Case for Animal Rights. By Tom Regan. 365-72.---. Foundations of Environmental Ethics. By Eugene C. Hargrove. 169-77.---. A Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Watersheds. By Gary Snyder. 321-26.Cannavo, Peter F. Deliberative Environmental Politics: Democracy and Ecological Rationality. By Walter F. Baber and Robert V. Bartlett. 319-22, Carey, Seamus. Before the Voice of Reason: Echoes of Responsibility in Merleauu-Ponty's Ecology and Levinas's Ethics. By David Michael Kleinberg-Levin. : 323-26.---. Eco-Phenomenology: Back to the Earth Itself. Edited by Charles S. Brown and Ted Toadvine. 327-30.---. An Ethics of Place: Radical Ecology, Postmodernity,and Social Theory. 417-20.---. Rethinking Nature: Essays in Environmental Philosophy. Edited by Bruce V. Foltz and Robert Frodeman. 217-20.

Essays On Environmental Protection Written In …
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In the past couple of years, the transhumanist movement has been growing fast and furiously. Local groups are mushrooming in all parts of the world. Awareness of transhumanist ideas is spreading. Transhumanism is undergoing the transition from being the preoccupation of a fringe group of intellectual pioneers to becoming a mainstream approach to understanding the prospects for technological transformation of the human condition. That technological advances will help us overcome many of our current human limitations is no longer an insight confined to a few handfuls of techno-savvy visionaries. Yet understanding the consequences of these anticipated possibilities and the ethical choices we will face is a momentous challenge that humanity will be grappling with over the coming decades. The transhumanist tradition has produced a (still evolving) body of thinking to illuminate these complex issues that is unparalleled in its scope and depth of foresight.

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Environmental movement - Wikipedia


Conservation movement - Wikipedia

For Legrand, compliance with the Group's ethical commitments, formally set out in the charter of fundamental principles, is a priority. In 2009, the Group's ethics representatives - over sixty in number - attended a training session webcast by the Company Secretariat, the Human Resources Department and the Group Internal Communication Department. The aims of this session were as follows:
- Providing information on the 2009 update of the Charter of Fundamental Principles and the creation of a practical guide. In particular, the updating of the charter made it possible to develop the Legrand Group's position on Human Rights and the fight against discrimination, complying with the key international texts, as well as on issues relating to the protection of property and on confidentiality. It also provided an opportunity to add to the themes of the prevention policy and environmental policy. A supplement on the subject of competition was published this year.
- To formalize the strengthening of the group alert system, with the creation of a generic email address used to directly receive information on any difficulties and questions Legrand Group employees might have. This system complements the local role of the ethics representatives.
- To facilitate the sharing of experience within the Legrand Group. In addition to the Group training session, both local and more specific, activity-based training courses are organised on a regular basis.
Another area of action for Legrand is the fight against corruption. In June 2011, a webcast training session was organised to make Ethics representatives aware of a corruption prevention initiative. New training materials on this topic have been created, supplementing the Group Charter of Fundamental Principles.
Finally, Legrand wants its suppliers to make a commitment in terms of social and environmental responsibility. Our suppliers are therefore encouraged to comply with the principles of the Global Compact to which the Group signed up in 2006. To date, 62% of the Group's total purchases are from strategic suppliers who share the principles of the Global Compact. Furthermore, since 2007, the "purchasing" specifications include Legrand's requirements in terms of the environment, health and safety at work, respect of human rights and compliance with labour law. Compliance with this purchasing policy is now one of the criteria for the selection and monitoring of the performance of suppliers. In its objectives for 2011 to 2013, Legrand will extend the evaluation of suppliers to include sustainable development criteria and continue to train Group purchasing personnel in the field of responsible purchasing.
In order to facilitate the implementation of the approach in terms of purchasing, our head buyers and quality specialists participated in a session to increase awareness of the Sustainable Development approach with suppliers and to present the related tools and processes. Since 2011, a sustainable development module has been incorporated in all training sessions for newly hired purchasing personnel.

In 2009, the Legrand Group Purchasing Department participated in drawing up the national charter "10 commitments for responsible purchasing". This charter provides a framework for dealings between major instructing parties and SMEs / VSBs. In France, Legrand has signed up to the 10 Responsible Commitments Charter.

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